The Writer’s Blog Tour

My Very Clever Friend Snazzy has dobbed me in for this. She writes amazing televisions, and the other day she got to be an extra in a TV show she created and wrote, wearing a medieval gown and holding an owl, so that’s really all you need to know about how excellent she is.

 

What am I working on? 

Three main things: working on two novels, working on my PhD, gestating a tiny human.

I’m in the edit stages of a novel at the moment that will either be called Bewildering or Lobstergirl and Shopping Trolley Guy or something else entirely. It’s a YA agricultural environmental superhero rom-com. Sort of. It’s about two very different teenagers who live in a really, really ugly suburb called Valentine. They bond over comic books and activism, and begin a secret guerrilla gardening project to beautify their town and wake the citizens up to the possibility of positive environmental change. Also hopefully it will be funny and there will be kissing. Out with Allen & Unwin in 2015.

The second novel is something very, very different for me, and it won’t be out until 2016 at the earliest, so I don’t want to talk about it too much. But it is dark, and a bit thrillery, and has involved a lot of utterly fascinating research. At the moment it’s called The Subtle Body, but I’ve never published a book that kept its working title, so who knows what it’ll end up as.

The PhD is on the ways in which YA is making teen readers more politically engaged. It’s super-fun, and should be finished mid-2015.

The tiny human is due for release in mid-October.

 

How does my work differ from others in my genre?

The good thing about YA is that it can be pretty much whichever genre you choose. I’ve written historical fiction, magic realism, non-fiction, crime and romance. I like to write about smart, interesting, flawed girls who want things. One of my least favourite literary trends is the Dead Girl – girls dying so boys can have feelings, dead mothers, dead protagonists, and of course all the dead girls on YA book covers. So I’d like to think that my books feature girls who are decidedly alive.

 

Why do I write what I do?

Because I love it. Lots of people ask writers whether we write for an audience or for ourselves, and I think for the vast majority of us, the answer is ‘both’. I write the kinds of books I like to read, but I also hope that others will read and enjoy them too. Funny, romantic books tend to get overlooked – not by readers, but by the media and by awards judges (as do books with female protagonists). Romance is seen as something trashy – a Proper Literary Book has to have Death and Tragedy. I honestly don’t understand this – surely love is the most basic element of being a human being – don’t we all want to love, and to be loved? I also think it takes an enormous amount of skill to explore complicated themes and subjects with a humorous touch, but generally once a book is funny, it’s again considered to be somehow lowbrow.

So I suppose I write what I do because I want to make people laugh, and have squishy romantic feelings, and think about the world in new and different ways. Is that too much to ask?

 

How does my writing process work?

Generally, I come up with an idea for a new book, or sometimes a few ideas. I then sit down with my editor at Allen & Unwin and we have a chat, firm up the idea, and then I go away and write a proposal. This proposal is then taken to some sort of secret important board of superheroes and world leaders, and then a contract is drawn up. Then I go away and write the first draft.

I write using Scrivener, a piece of software designed for writers, as opposed to Microsoft Word, which is designed for talking paperclips. I sketch out a rough outline, and then create a list of chapters, with a sentence or two on what will happen in each chapter. I figure out how long I want the book to be (usually between 60-80,000 words), and space my chapters out accordingly, so the climax comes in the right place. I use a lot of techniques from the screenwriting world for this structuring process, to make sure that the story flows smoothly, without any boring bits.

I don’t write chronologically. Once I have my chapter plan, I write whichever bit I’m feeling the most excited about on a particular day. The story comes together in a piecemeal way, and I don’t get stuck or bored. It means though, that this early draft is utterly incomprehensible, as it is peppered with PUT FUNNY STORY HERE and FIGURE OUT HOW SHE ESCAPES and MORE FEELINGS IN THIS BIT. So once I have the bones, I go back over and polish it all up, fixing all the bits that I know are crap, and hoping I’m wrong about all the bits that I suspect are crap.

I then send to a few people. My editor, my mum, a screenwriter friend (usually the aforementioned Very Clever Sarah Dollard). After a few weeks, I get back my editorial letter. This letter usually goes something like this:

Dear Lili. We love this book. You are a genius. We would just like you to change one small thing – the words. Love, Your Editors.

Then begins the editorial process, which I actually quite enjoy, because it’s all about making the book better.
And now I shall pass the torch of bloggy writing fire to three other excellent writers:

Myke Bartlett is a journalist and YA author. His debut novel, Fire in the Sea, won the 2011 Text Prize and was published to great acclaim in 2012.

Carole Wilkinson is the author of like a zillion books but is best known for her multi-award-winning Dragonkeeper series, and for being my mum.

 AJ Betts is the author of Zac & Mia, which won the 2012 Text Prize and also just last week the Ethel Turner Prize at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. Hurrah!

Posted on 26 May 2014 • 8 comments

Structure Workshop at 100 Story Building

I’ll be teaching this workshop on story structure on Saturday 24 May, and if you want to write a novel, or you have a work-in-progress and need a bit of a nudge on structure, then you should definitely consider coming along.

100 Story Building is a centre for young writers based in Melbourne’s inner-west, that also runs writing programs for adults. It’s totally awesome and you should check it out.

Posted on 29 April 2014 • No comments

Reaching Out – Messages of Hope

Fifteen-year-old Mariah Kennedy is passionate about fighting for social justice. As the UNICEF Australia Young Ambassador, Mariah created REACHING OUTas a fundraising project and all author royalties will be donated to UNICEF. Heartfelt and inspiring, this book contains stories, poems and illustrations that have been donated by some of the most world?s renowned and respected authors and illustrators, including Graeme Base, Jackie French, Michael Leunig, Bruce Whatley, Michael Morpurgo, Andy Griffiths, Anna Perera, Libby Gleeson, Melina Marchetta, Alison Lester, Morris Gleitzman and many more.

I’m one of the “many more”! My story “The Leaving” is in this wonderful anthology. Hurrah! Thanks, Mariah, for letting me be a part of such a wonderful project. You’re an inspiration.

More info here.

Posted on 24 August 2013 • 2 comments

Four years Pink

Here are two things that have changed since the publication of Pink in 2009:

1. I used to be a bit nervous about saying that, at the beginning of the book, Ava has a girlfriend. I got some disapproving looks from teachers, especially at religious schools. Students would giggle and whisper. One girl loudly informed me that it was “gross”. Not anymore. Four years later, and nobody blinks. It’s just part of the story. Nothing unusual. This is a really, really good thing.

2. Four years ago, when I held up Pink, boys would wince. And girls would say “I like that cover”. Now, instead of mentioning the cover, boys and girls alike (but mostly girls) squeal IS THAT A QUOTE FROM JOHN GREEN ON THE COVER!???

And one thing that hasn’t changed:

I get more fan mail about Pink than all my other books put together. I’ve received so many emails from people (young and old) who say that Ava’s experiences spoke to them, and made them feel braver, or less alone, or prouder about being a nerd. And I’m so grateful for those emails, and so very glad that the book is reaching new readers, and that people are still enjoying it.

Buy Pink in Australia

Buy Pink in the US

Buy Pink in the UK

 

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Posted on 20 August 2013 • 1 comment

Georgia Peach

I’m so delighted to learn that Pink has been nominated for the Georgia Peach Award!

The purpose of the Georgia Peach Award is to highlight and promote the best current young adult literature for Georgia high school age students, to encourage young adults to read and to promote the development of cooperative school and public library services for young adults. Teens vote for their favorite books out of the year’s top 20 nominees at their high schools and local public libraries.

It sounds a bit like the Inky Awards here in Australia, so it must be awesome.

Pink

 

Posted on 24 July 2013 • 3 comments

Blog! Stuff! Books!

Things are super busy here in my world. Working on my new book, which has transformed itself into also being part of my PhD. Also working on my thesis, which I’m enjoying so much more than I thought I would. I love literary criticism! Who knew?

I’m also super busy at various schools, festivals and other events. I’m really enjoying being a host for The Wheeler Centre’s Texts In The City program – I’m reading lots of things I’ve always meant to read, and rereading some old favourites. I do a lot of talking about my own books, so it’s very refreshing to be able to talk about someone else’s! And I get to do more of that on Monday night when I’m Q&Aing with the wonderful Patrick Ness at the Athenaeum.

And next Saturday I get to talk with Penni Russon at the Emerging Writers Festival, which will be excellent.

Other things that are going on include: I have an awesome new friend through the Big Brothers Big Sisters Young Achievers program, which I’m totally loving, except tomorrow we are playing laser tag and I’m a bit scared.

There’s also lots of house and garden stuff going on around here, and to avoid boring you all with endless photos of plans and plants, I’ve started a garden blog. But there are some literary connections, because there is some sneaky gardening in my next book.

SPEAKING OF BOOKS. Remember how I wrote that book called The Zigzag Effect which came out two months ago? Well people seem to really like it, which is great. I’m enjoying performing magic tricks (okay, trick. I only know one) at schools and reading out scenes that contain buckets full of wee.

Posted on 18 May 2013 • 2 comments

The Zigzag Effect launch!

The Zigzag Effect comes out in less than a month! And there’ll be a celebratory event at Readings Carlton, where I’ll be in conversation with Emily Gale! You should totally come along.

Posted on 26 February 2013 • 2 comments

The Next Big Thing

Simmone Howell has tagged me to do this, and it’s SUPER late because I got distracted by Christmas. But here we go!

 

1) What is the working title of your next book?
The Zigzag Effect. That’s the final title. For a while it was Never Miss A Trick, then The Sucker Effect, then about a million other things, but now it is definitely, finally The Zigzag Effect.

2) Where did the idea come from for the book?
A documentary about magician’s assistants. There is a bunch of ladies whose job it is to dress up in a spangly little leotard, look beautiful, get tied up, cut in half and made to disappear. Creepy, amirite?

3) What genre does your book fall under?
YA. More specifically, YA romcrime, which is a mystery with kissing. A kisstery.

4) What actors would you choose to play the part of your characters in a movie rendition?
Jennifer Lawrence as Sage, the main character. Andrew Garfield as Herb, the love interest. And Taylor Swift as Bianca, the magician’s assistant. Ooh, and Alan Rickman as The Great Armand. Except then they’d all have to pretend to be Australian. I really should know more Australian actors.

5) What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?
Backstage kissing, vanishing magicians and ghost-photography – Sage Kealley’s new job is more than she’d bargained for!
6) Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
Published Australia in April 2013 by Allen & Unwin. Represented in the US by KT Literary.

7) How long did it take you to write the first draft of the manuscript?
The first draft probably took five months. The whole thing in around eighteen months.

8)What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?
It has a similar feel to my previous books Pocketful of Eyes and Love-Shy.

9) Who or what inspired you to write this book?
Partly wanting to explore some of the bizarreness that comes with being a magician’s assistant. Partly wanting to learn more about stage magic.

10) What else about the book might pique the reader’s interest?
There is a bunny called Warren. There is a kissing scene which takes place in the dark, near a bucket full of wee. There may or may not be a ghost.


Posted on 3 January 2013 • 2 comments

2013!

Well. I was pretty rubbish at blogging in 2012. But in my defense, I did:

  • get engaged
  • release a new book
  • buy a house
  • move house
  • get married
  • go on a honeymoon
  • go through PhD confirmation
  • write a novel (more on that tomorrow)
  • do over a hundred talks/workshops in schools
  • attended four literary festivals
  • and like a million other things that I can’t remember.

It’s been a pretty damn awesome year. I’m hoping 2013 will be just as wonderful as 2012 was. I have lots of super exciting projects coming up. Plus in three weeks we are getting a PUPPY. YAY!

Posted on 2 January 2013 • 2 comments

The Zigzag Effect cover reveal!

Introducing my next book – The Zigzag Effect!

It’s about Sage Kealley, who gets a job working for a stage magician. Naturally, not everything is as it seems…

I LOVE this cover. Look at the bunny! (his name is Warren, and he is VERY important to the story)

 

Posted on 19 November 2012 • 6 comments